Boss Keloid – Melted On The Inch

Label: Holy Roar Records. Release date: 27 April 2018.

Holy Roar Records know a good thing when they hear it. Since the end of last year, the record label have signed the likes of MØL, GARGANJUA and BOSS KELOID, all of whom are on the verge of great things. The latter two also share a sludgy, doom style. With Melted On The Inch however, BOSS KELOID are veering towards a progressive multi-dimensional sound that 2016’s Herb Your Enthusiasm hinted at. This is, hands down, the best material the likeable chaps from Wigan have blessed upon us weary doom travellers. Six tracks of massive and expansive noises are sure to set BOSS KELOID amongst the ranks of British metal hopes. With Melted On The Inch, they’ve nurtured and fine-tuned their style. They sound like…BOSS KELOID.

Opening with the absolute cracker Chronosiam, it sounds like a glorious sea shanty. Vocalist Alex Hurst absolutely belts out as usual and it is cathartic to listen to his warbles. The production and mix leaves an organic rawness which provides a refuge of comfort in Hurst’s voice and the band’s psychedelic riffs. Very hypnotic in places, the song effortlessly flows from calm and brooding to loud and rapturous. An ambitious start to the album, Chronosiam is seven minutes of pure joy, it doesn’t seem quite right to use the word ‘doom’ here.

Tarku Shavel begins as quite a relaxed affair, but the chorus is absolutely storming. I really enjoy this aspect of BOSS KELOID, the quieter moments versus the bolder segments. Each delivered with confident aplomb. The verses have a gorgeous colour to them, sounding like sun-soaked days on a lengthy voyage. It is halfway through Tarku Shavel that shines. A large helping of psychedelic doom gives the song an exotic edge. Hurst once again interrupts our thoughts with his killer vocal delivery. An absolutely stellar tune.

The opening of Peykruve reminds me of that hypnotic bass tone in Lung Mountain from Herb Your Enthusiasm. The first minute and a half is a spectacular instrumental which teases and soothes with its retro meanderings. Hurst yet again impresses, but it is the gorgeously retro instrumentation that steals the show in Peykruve. The band sound like PURSON in places, conjuring a psychedelic paradise with a combination of the irresistible organ and thumping doom riffs. Peykruve is a treat for the senses.

The organ is back for Jromalih but after the fantastic Peykruve I find this song a bit trickier to get into. The intro is a funky little ditty but for me, with the exception of Hurst belting out some killer choruses, the song doesn’t really go anywhere. Lokannok has a few interesting nuggets going on though. With groovy and whirring instrumentation, things really pick up with a fantastic riff and the signature blarings of Hurst that continue to ramp up.

Then all of a sudden we have reached the finale of the album, Griffonbrass. One of the shorter songs on Melted On The Inch, it gets the job done by giving BOSS KELOID the blistering send-off they deserve. The song seems to feature motifs from the album; from the rumbling bass and exotic guitar licks, to a cheeky bit of organ and a large dollop of Hurst. Bold and epic, BOSS KELOID are well on their way to getting their hybrid of metal launched to the masses. With oodles of appeal and a lush colour to their sound, don’t be surprised if the Boss hoss their way further into the metal community’s hearts.