Minors – Abject Bodies

Label: Holy Roar Records. Release date: 22 February 2019.

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This is already a contender for nastiest album of the year. Canada’s MINORS are set to release second album Abject Bodies and it’s the finest slab of noisy, sludgy hardcore you’ll hear all year; it would even make the likes of CONVERGE and WILL HAVEN weep from the bleakness of it. It begins with the dismal title track – a doomy and dissonant instrumental before second track Consumed rips you a new one. Powerviolence bludgens you at the start of the song along with its urgent ‘chorus’. The brilliantly punky vocals make for a more intense listen.

Meanderist continues the angry-as-fuck intensity with its ferocious groove. It really does sound like the lovechild between CURSED and NAILS. It’s a white knuckle ride throughout. The noise seamlessly meanders (pun intended) into Flesh Prison which is a deliciously morbid and darkly groovy track. The sludgy riffs topped with powerviolent tendencies is fantastically striking, making for an all-rounded assault.

A chaotic, grindcore punkfest ensues with the magnificent Boneyard. It sounds exactly what you’d expect a boneyard to sound like; crushing, ugly and complete with unexpected blackened passages. The last half is a stunning chunk of devastating riffage. An outstanding track which is followed by an entirely different beast in the form of Erode. Beginning with a soundscape akin to ISIS or PELICAN, it slowly develops into the sludgy opus it turns out to be. The slow start heightens the sense of incoming catastrophe. The down-tempo continues with the addition of the tortured vocals, making for a downright filthy penultimate track.

The brooding finale Garden of Dismalism is back to the dark and distorted textures. The contorted soundscape builds up to create a chaotic and claustrophobic climax. Abject Bodies is anything but a relaxing listen with an uneasy tension throughout. One thing’s for sure – MINORS are more than an angry hardcore band…their sound is mature, calculated and terrifying. Listen at your own peril.

Svalbard/Møl/Group of Man

The Black Heart, Camden. 24 May 2018.

A sold out show at The Black Heart is always going to be a hot and sweaty affair. It’s also a special evening as it’s the album release show for SVALBARD, the first ever UK show for MØL and also an album release date for GROUP OF MAN. All of whom had their most recent records released by Holy Roar Records. A bit of a Holy Roar showcase if you will.

Heading upstairs just as opening act GROUP OF MAN are about to start and the room is almost full to capacity already. The UK post-hardcore troupe recently released EP What We Got In Common and the band were bouncing off it. Post-hardcore with a bit of groove, it took a while for the crowd to feel it but by the end of their set, they had the room nodding along and cheering. A good start.

Now for something a bit different. It’s no secret I’ve become a massive MØL fan, having reviewed their debut album Jord which was released in April and interviewing the lovely chaps just before this very show. MØL’s music needs an equally powerful and emotive live response so my expectations were very high and I was anticipating the atmosphere the Danish blackgaze group would evoke. Let’s just say I was not disappointed. As soon as MØL kicked in with Penumbra, the crowd was enraptured with the intense performance and huge sound the band produced. Frontman Kim Song Sternkopf is an absolute madman on stage, almost knocking people off their feet with a swing of his mic stand. His voice held out live too, in fact all the components of MØL sounded on par. Playing the songs Storm, Ligament and Vakuum, it all amazingly sounds like it does on record. When the band finished with the title track, Kim was in the crowd almost reducing the Black Heart to rubble. MØL are one of those bands you feel lucky to have seen in a small venue. Catch them before they get huge!

After the stunning performance by MØL, tonight’s headliners SVALBARD had a hard act to follow. By now the venue was heaving with hot and sweaty bodies but everyone was in high spirits. Serena Cherry and co took the stage and they were thrilled to see the turnout for their release show for It’s Hard To Have Hope. Considering the intense topics covered in the album, there was a strong sense of fun and positivity in the room, with the band members clearly having fun and sharing jokes with the crowd. Playing songs from the new album and One Day All This Will End, the band were amazed at the amount of people who already knew the words to new songs such as Unpaid Intern and Revenge Porn with the rest of the set being well received and increasingly chaotic. Serena took a moment in between songs to thank Holy Roar Records for their support and great work ethic. And seeing the quality of the roster tonight and the stellar performances from the bands, you have to agree Holy Roar are onto something special.

Link to my interview with SVALBARD can be found here: Q&A with Svalbard

Link to album review of It’s Hard To Have Hope is here: Svalbard – It’s Hard To Have Hope

Link to my interview with MØL can be found here: INTERVIEW: MØL

Link to my album review of Jord is here: Møl – Jord

 

 

Q&A with Svalbard

Frontwoman Serena Cherry on their live shows, feminism and tough song topics.

SVALBARD have just released their latest album It’s Hard To Have Hope and their album release show at the Black Heart, Camden went down a storm. I asked frontwoman Serena Cherry about the new record, bands she recommends and fans’ reactions to their hard-hitting song topics…

Q. You’ve just finished a UK tour and released your new album It’s Hard To Have Hope. How were the new songs received live? 

Serena: I was genuinely astounded by the reactions to the new songs live, people already knew some of the words which was crazy! It’s really nerve-wracking, to be playing new material for the first time on a tour, so it’s a major relief to me that the crowd seemed to enjoy the new songs so much.

Q. The album seems to be getting some really good responses. With the hard hitting topics covered in the album, have you had any indication that fans have related to the themes? 

Serena: A few people have reached out to share their stories with me, with regards to their own experiences of unpaid internships or sexual assault at gigs. I think there is a huge power within the bravery of people sharing their personal experiences, even if the experiences are often traumatic. When you discover that other people have been through similar experiences you feel less isolated by what you have suffered.

Q. I have to unfortunately admit I relate to the song Unpaid Intern. The work climate for our generation is a joke at times. What spurred you to write the song? Have you yourselves had bad experiences with jobs?

Serena: Sorry to hear that! The majority of my working life has been a string of exploitation and bad experiences. Such is the joy of needing a zero hours contract to enable you to get time off to tour. When it comes to Unpaid Internships, I’ve never had one as it’s something I could never afford to do. Being from a working class background means I am never financially comfortable enough to work for free. That’s what the song is about: how unpaid internships basically restrict the poor from access to certain job roles. Speaking personally, as a writer, I have had several companies offer me unpaid internships and I have to turn them down because…you know, I have to pay rent and bills and stuff. I can’t just go a few months without income. So I know too well that feeling of a door of opportunity slamming shut in your face, not because you don’t have the appropriate skills, but simply you are poor.

Q. I saw your album release show at the Black Heart, Camden, and your comment about the hard work ethic and amazing support of your label Holy Roar really stuck in my memory. Just how important is it to have a good relationship with your label?

Serena: You have to have a label that understands and supports your vision, otherwise the whole creative process becomes stifled and restricted by what “the big bosses” want you to make. We are very fortunate to be with Holy Roar as they aren’t afraid to take risks, they appreciate musical diversity and they support us for who we are, rather than for what they think they can make from us. In some ways, I’d hate to be on a bigger label and have to churn out the same safe, toned-down product just so the guys at the top can afford one more ivory backscratcher.

Q. What struck me about your live show is the positivity and sense of fun as a band you project, especially considering the difficult topics you cover. Do you find being yourselves and being positive help to get your messages across to the audience?

Serena: That’s interesting! I never think of us as particularly positive, but I guess we do have fun when we play together and we would never make an attempt to hide that enjoyment. I just assume it doesn’t come across! In the live setting, as I am actually quite a shy person, I have to really make a conscious effort and force myself to talk to the crowd. I find it quite daunting, but at the same time I think we have written the music with a message, so we should discuss these things onstage too. It just takes a lot of effort for me to come out of my shell when I have to actually talk instead of scream!

Q. We’re seeing a shift of strong women fronting metal bands who are not afraid of confronting issues relating to the objectification and disrespect of women, with the likes of VENOM PRISON and SVALBARD with yourself. I was especially moved by your passionate performance of your song Revenge Porn when I saw you live.  Do you feel you are able to give a voice to women, not just in the metal community but in general?

Serena: I think it’s incredibly important for women to have a voice in metal, to be represented and respected as musicians, rather than dismissed or pushed out or othered. I am keen to address sexism within the music industry head on and to speak out about injustices, but I never want to assume I speak for others. I can only share my views and experiences and hope to generate a healthy discussion on how things can change for the better!

Q. Have you received any backlash to your feminist approach? 

Serena: Yeah. From being called a Feminazi, to being dismissed as having “no hard evidence” when talking about sexual assault, to a reviewer saying we couldn’t “identify as a feminist band because we are not an all-female band.” You don’t have to be female to be feminist! Every member of SVALBARD is for equal rights, it doesn’t matter what gender they identify with, they can still acknowledge oppressive patriarchal systems. To say you can only be a feminist if you are a female is such a reductive way of thinking.

Q. Lastly, with my blog I focus on new and up and coming bands. Are there any bands on your radar people should check out?

They’re not exactly new, but COR SCORPII and SHYLMAGOGHNAR have been captivating my ears recently. There’s a band who practice in the same studio as us called DOWNARD who are also very good.

 

 

Stay tuned for my gig review of SVALBARD/MØL/GROUP OF MAN. In the meantime you can read my review of SVALBARD’s It’s Hard To Have Hope by following the link below:

Svalbard – It’s Hard To Have Hope Review

INTERVIEW: MØL

A conversation with the Danish blackgaze group about their album, music and the year ahead.

Relaxing downstairs at Camden’s Brew Dog, MØL vocalist Kim Song Sternkopf and guitarist Frederik Lippert are in high spirits and excited about the events of the day. Having flown over from Denmark that morning Frederik tells me this is their first ‘flying gig’, their first time flying over as a band and first time in the UK. “A lot of firsts” laughs Frederik as the other members of MØL join us in the booth; guitarist Nicolai Busse Hansen, bassist Holger Rumph-Frost and drummer Ken Lund Klejs. First thing I wanted to do was learn how to pronounce MØL (meaning moth) correctly, it’s more like ‘moel’, “or ‘mooel’ if you’re from Copenhagen” jokes Nicolai. The title for their debut album Jord (meaning earth) is pronounced ‘yor’, with the ‘d’ being silent and the ‘j’ having the European ‘y’ sound. Having got to grips with the Danish it was time to get the lowdown on the life of MØL…

Before MØL, were you in bands before? How did you guys come together as a band?

Nicolai: Ken and I played in a shoegaze band which broke apart when I moved to England to study. We wanted to continue making shoegaze music and wanted to be harder I guess.

Ken: It kinda took over and we just did more our own thing, whatever we wanted to do. I’ve been very much influenced by heavy metal, metal in general and with the shoegaze it kinda moved into something else.

Nicolai: It was around that time we started exploring the boundaries of shoegaze, bands like ALCEST were moving into it and other European bands. That’s what kind of inspired it.

Holger: I’ve played in another band before and it was something completely different. It was like melodic death metal and I met Nicolai in coalition with another project and we just started talking about our common interest in black metal and shoegaze music and it was natural for me to join when there was an open spot for a bass player.

Ken: Frederik joined when I tried to form another different project and he came in…

Frederik: I didn’t know what it was we were trying to do…

Ken: No it didn’t become anything and it was like “hey! Would you play in this shoegazey thing we’re doing?”. And he was like “yeah ok” and then we, er…dissolved.

Kim: That didn’t work, but you had another idea with Nicolai.

Ken: Yeah, so we had my cousin on bass, he left the band and we had Steffen on vocals who also is not in the band anymore. And then we got Kim two years ago and that also added a whole new level to the sound of MØL.

Kim: I originally came from death metal and I also play in another band where I do post-hardcore and chaotic-hardcore stuff. So I played in a technical death metal band called 100 KNIVES INSIDE before and I actually knew the guys. I think I took photos of your second gig…

Nicolai: That’s when I broke my collar bone and so we had Simon as a stand in.

Frederik: Ah yes Simon from the Danish black metal band SUNKEN.

Kim: So it’s a mish-mash of a lot of different bands. Steffen stopped doing the band and I think our manager, Mirza actually hinted that I was pretty fond of the music so we kind of found out that it would actually fit. I think for me, I’ve always been drawn to more atmospheric music and something that’s more moody, but the other bands that I’ve played in I’ve never really had the chance to explore that realm so it’s really something that taps into something. That’s what I’m really fond of, that mood, I only get that from post-rock or classical music.

I was wondering this, if some members were more shoegaze than others or how the sound came about. So with the whole ‘blackgaze’ thing, is that something you were aspiring to, or are you happy to just fall under that bracket?

Holger: That’s a good question. When Ken started this shoegaze project, there was then a huge wave with DEAFHEAVEN and SUNBATHER and so on, also ALCEST. We’re doing an abnormal thing combining these two genres and I don’t think we’re inspired so much, I don’t think we can deny that.

Ken: I mean I hadn’t heard of SUNBATHER before we started to be honest. We were doing black metal, I love black metal and especially symphonic metal, so we kinda just edited it in and when we heard those bands as well we were like cool! That really sounds nice. You know, we’re the only ones doing it. What we were doing wasn’t actually solid enough because other people as well were doing it.

Kim: I also think because a lot of people are comparing us with DEAFHEAVEN so you think you kind of want to break away from that, although it’s not a bad thing. But we definitely want to do our own thing.

I suppose the danger of being seen as part of a trend is when that trend ends it might spell the end. So how do you see your sound evolving?

Ken: I guess just doing whatever we wanna do still I guess!

Kim: The transition from the previous EP to now I think, there’s like a really distinct prioritisation of some certain elements, especially in some of your guitar work…[Nicolai]

Nicolai: What are you thinking?

Kim: It’s got kinda heavier. Not as typical gaze but it’s more rocky.

Nicolai: Yeah I think it’s a good way to put it. There’s a focus on writing the metal parts to work and of course combining them with shoegaze parts and making them flow together.

Ken: And in general we’re better musicians now so we can do more things that we actually want to do and that’s important for MØL because we’re doing it so much. And Kim also put a whole new level on the singing and the lyrics and with everything mixed in it made a lot of difference.

Kim: The instrumentation, the whole picture, what really got me on board was the opportunity to be kinda a part of the orchestration, so that I don’t just specifically sound like a vocalist but as an instrument on the same level as everybody else in the band, contributing to this sound. So it’s relaxing to you you’re not the one driving the whole show that you usually do as a frontman in a death metal or hardcore act for that matter, so relying on this intense atmosphere that we’re trying to create that’s really something that’s brought a new dimension into my songwriting or at least my way of using vocals. So I think the main thing about where I come from I really thought about not doing purely high pitched vocals all the way through, so I think the variation that I provide with some death metal growls and some hardcore vocals as well, that can support this dynamic of all the shifts and stuff that actually happens throughout the whole album.

The album has been out for about a month now, so how has the response been? How have you been finding it all? Because you’ve been getting some pretty good responses!

Frederik: It feels like we’ve had several months of good feedback in a short amount of time so we’re very grateful for the response we’ve got.

Ken: The opportunities we’ve been offered have been the greatest already.

Kim: But it’s also because half a year ago we were recording this album and were planning on releasing it on our Danish management, so none of this was even in our minds back then. And then Holy Roar came in the picture and then suddenly everything just blew up.

Ken: That opened up a new door and the response we got and the great PR work they made and all of a sudden..boom! In come the offers and we have a lot in store. We can’t say anything [laughs]. We got some goodies coming.

I’m looking forward to hearing that! You’ve got Arctangent and Damnation festival coming up, what else are you looking forward to this year?

Ken: Seeing other bands at Damnation [laughs].

Frederik: And Arctangent.

Kim: We have some touring in store but that will be revealed later.

Holger: In general just getting out and playing more shows like we’re doing now with this tour. That is at least for me, what it’s all about. Getting out and meeting new people and playing some music.

Ken: It’s funny you make music sort of for yourself, but then you see all these people on Instagram upload the album, the album that we made, it’s really touching. It’s like damn, this guy gets it! [laughs]

Holger: Also the fact that, at least I don’t have any reference of whether is it good is it bad, it’s just something that I like and we like and we think it’s good music and then the fact other people like us is really touching.

Kim: All those personal messages we have over the past month has just been really overwhelming. I think it takes a lot of courage to listen to something and think I’m gonna write to those guys, I’m gonna say this really means something to me.

Especially with new bands, some people still don’t check out new bands.

Kim: Yes you know, it is an oversaturated market and with all the streaming services to even get noticed just a little bit, that just doesn’t happen everyday. We’re really grateful. And talking about the lyrical context and the theme of the whole album like…I joined MØL at a time where I was kind of in a down-low period, so I was burned out with stress so this album kind of is a way of processing that really awful period in my life and that’s just really weird, you know performing those songs live because as a vocalist you’re actually sharing a pretty private place.

So does it become really cathartic to perform it live?

Frederik: It’s amazing to see people share the same feelings.

Kim: I think that’s the essence of both our concepts, much of what we experience of the band is the feeling that you get to get to project or share with the audience. That’s something of substance.

For me personally, when I first heard Jord I just latched onto the emotion and I could just immerse myself in it and then when I did my review, when I read more after I wrote mine everyone else seemed to have the same experience. So it seems a lot of people not necessarily relates to the lyrics, but relates to the emotion that comes out of the music. And I’m really interested to see how that translates live. So how would you describe your live show?

Nicolai: It’s going to be a lot different tonight, it’s quite a smaller stage to what we’re used to. We used to have a light show and also smoke, so it’s going to be…

Frederik: Bare bones tonight.

Holger: But we have a lot of experience with these closer support shows. We did a Europe tour about two years ago, which were mostly sports and smaller places.

Kim: That was before my time so I’m still looking forward to it.

Frederik: We played in an abandoned orphanage which we found out the day after we slept in there overnight.

Ken: So we’re cursed from now on but that’s fine.

Frederik: That was Germany.

Ken: A wine cellar in Paris…some really cool places.

Frederik: Unique experiences.

Ken: The mood kinda changes we often feel the room, sometimes the smaller shows get more intense and ferocious because the sound in general in the room compresses it. Then larger venues are maybe more mellow. It’s kinda reading the room and the sound you have and take it from there.

Kim: I think it’s cool at this point we can encompass both kinda shows, either the more intimate, intense, small pub show and the big live set-up. We recently got a light technician who does some shows with us, they made like a whole LED panel and stuff and we do usually bring strobe lights and fog machines. This will be a bit more plain…

Ken: Straight in your face. But it will be good.

On a last note, so with my blog I focus on new and up and coming bands. Are there any bands on your radar that people should check out?

Frederik: I’ll start, there’s a Norwegian black metal band called CHÊNE. They’re really amazing guys, I really recommend checking them out.

Holger: We’ve been jamming that hard.

Frederik: Their album is called Atlas.

Nicolai: I’m gonna go for a Copenhagen band called WOES, because their second album is really good and they’re kinda this hardcore/melodic hardcore. Really, really good.

Ken: ASTRONOID I guess. It’s not a new band.

Holger: They’re not a new band but they’ve just toured with TESSERACT.

Ken: It’s kinda the same sound as us but much lighter and happier. I think it’s a cool mix. And more symphonic. It shouldn’t work, it’s like spacegaze/powergaze [laughs].

Holger: I know you’ll pick these [Kim] but I’m gonna pick CABAL, from Copenhagen.

Yep, yeah I know them. I reviewed Mark Of Rot then I found out you [Kim] did the artwork…

Kim: Yeah, I have another one. I have some good friends in a band called TELOS and they just released a two track EP called HELIOS/SELÊNÊ.

And there we have it. The history and musical style of MØL explained by the band themselves. They then had to dash off to soundcheck and considering they mentioned the plainer stage show they were anticipating tonight, no one could expect the incredible performance that was to come. My gig review will be up soon. All will be revealed. M

Svalbard – It’s Hard To Have Hope

Label: Holy Roar Records. Release date: 25 May 2018.

The Bristolian quartet SVALBARD are proving to be a gem in the British metal scene. It’s Hard To Have Hope, the band’s second album is sure to propel the band further in high esteem. A band who do not shy away from tough topics, it would be easy to fall in the trap of focussing on the song titles and lyrical content, but the band’s music is just as hard-hitting. So much aggression AND passion has been poured into this album, I genuinely think it’s going to blow everyone away.

Starting with a topic most of our generation can unfortunately relate to, Unpaid Intern is as angry and aggressive you feel when you’re confronted with the pessimistic job prospects of today. What I find exciting about SVALBARD is their ability to avoid being pigeonholed. Hardcore is present, as well as post-rock riffs and black metal musings…and that’s just the beginning. I think this diversity hopefully predicts the longevity and accessibility of the band, as they will comfortably flow from one scene to another and it’s sometimes the crossover bands who achieve the most awesome things. Unpaid Intern is a perfect example of what SVALBARD are all about.

The dual vocals of guitarists Serena Cherry and Liam Phelan have a nostalgic KYLESA feel about them. I’ve always thought Cherry sounds a cross between Laura Pleasants and WALL OF JERICHO’s Candace Kucsulain. One of the most unforgiving female vocalists around, Cherry often steals the show on this record with her screams and hushed vocals. The latter can be heard at the beginning and end of second track, Revenge Porn. If the subject matter wasn’t so serious I would dare to call this song beautiful. A disgusting yet current topic, this song is complimented by the equally damning approach the band take with their delivery. A black metal influence is strong here, with its soundscapes and hectic drumming. Comparisons to OATHBREAKER could easily be made here but you can understand why label mates MØL will be joining SVALBARD as support for a few of their forthcoming shows, as they both have that glorious post-black metal sound.

Feminazi?! continues the black metal feeling with the drums and riffs sounding like WINTERFYLLETH and ENSLAVED. It is quite spectacular and once the middle eight kicks in you will be well and truly under SVALBARD’s spell. After two strong opening songs, this track keeps up the pace and gives It’s Hard To Have Hope a further, darker edge. Things slow down a notch with the opening of Pro-Life?!; Cherry sounds like she is channelling her inner MYRKUR, but things accelerate again in the usual black/post metal manner. The laidback moments shine and emphasise the heavier parts.

Next track For The Sake Of The Breed is one of the album’s highlights for sure. It rages HARD. It charges, drops, crashes and has the most brilliant pacing, bringing back those KYLESA vibes again. Things take more of a post-hardcore turn with How Do We Stop It? There is something about this song that feels different to the others. There’s less urgency but the emotions feel deeper, giving the track a heightened aura of importance. Similar can be said for Try Not To Die Until You’re Dead; the pace and delivery is modest and eerily mesmerising, but bursts of determination crash through with triumphant riffs and passionate vocals. This could be a dark horse to be fan favourite.

The album finale Iorek is an entirely different beast. It is an instrumental wonder, taking influence from post-rock and even indie, it provides light to the dark intensity of the record. The bright riffs create shimmering soundscapes and shine hope on the darkness. It provides a stunning conclusion to an incredible album. The organic production of It’s Hard To Have Hope ensures the gritty tunes retain their rawness. Beautifully constructed and executed, SVALBARD have potentially made a modern classic. The British underground scene is bursting with potential and SVALBARD are worming their way to be the cream of the crop.

Boss Keloid – Melted On The Inch

Label: Holy Roar Records. Release date: 27 April 2018.

Holy Roar Records know a good thing when they hear it. Since the end of last year, the record label have signed the likes of MØL, GARGANJUA and BOSS KELOID, all of whom are on the verge of great things. The latter two also share a sludgy, doom style. With Melted On The Inch however, BOSS KELOID are veering towards a progressive multi-dimensional sound that 2016’s Herb Your Enthusiasm hinted at. This is, hands down, the best material the likeable chaps from Wigan have blessed upon us weary doom travellers. Six tracks of massive and expansive noises are sure to set BOSS KELOID amongst the ranks of British metal hopes. With Melted On The Inch, they’ve nurtured and fine-tuned their style. They sound like…BOSS KELOID.

Opening with the absolute cracker Chronosiam, it sounds like a glorious sea shanty. Vocalist Alex Hurst absolutely belts out as usual and it is cathartic to listen to his warbles. The production and mix leaves an organic rawness which provides a refuge of comfort in Hurst’s voice and the band’s psychedelic riffs. Very hypnotic in places, the song effortlessly flows from calm and brooding to loud and rapturous. An ambitious start to the album, Chronosiam is seven minutes of pure joy, it doesn’t seem quite right to use the word ‘doom’ here.

Tarku Shavel begins as quite a relaxed affair, but the chorus is absolutely storming. I really enjoy this aspect of BOSS KELOID, the quieter moments versus the bolder segments. Each delivered with confident aplomb. The verses have a gorgeous colour to them, sounding like sun-soaked days on a lengthy voyage. It is halfway through Tarku Shavel that shines. A large helping of psychedelic doom gives the song an exotic edge. Hurst once again interrupts our thoughts with his killer vocal delivery. An absolutely stellar tune.

The opening of Peykruve reminds me of that hypnotic bass tone in Lung Mountain from Herb Your Enthusiasm. The first minute and a half is a spectacular instrumental which teases and soothes with its retro meanderings. Hurst yet again impresses, but it is the gorgeously retro instrumentation that steals the show in Peykruve. The band sound like PURSON in places, conjuring a psychedelic paradise with a combination of the irresistible organ and thumping doom riffs. Peykruve is a treat for the senses.

The organ is back for Jromalih but after the fantastic Peykruve I find this song a bit trickier to get into. The intro is a funky little ditty but for me, with the exception of Hurst belting out some killer choruses, the song doesn’t really go anywhere. Lokannok has a few interesting nuggets going on though. With groovy and whirring instrumentation, things really pick up with a fantastic riff and the signature blarings of Hurst that continue to ramp up.

Then all of a sudden we have reached the finale of the album, Griffonbrass. One of the shorter songs on Melted On The Inch, it gets the job done by giving BOSS KELOID the blistering send-off they deserve. The song seems to feature motifs from the album; from the rumbling bass and exotic guitar licks, to a cheeky bit of organ and a large dollop of Hurst. Bold and epic, BOSS KELOID are well on their way to getting their hybrid of metal launched to the masses. With oodles of appeal and a lush colour to their sound, don’t be surprised if the Boss hoss their way further into the metal community’s hearts.

Møl – Jord

Label: Holy Roar Records. Release date: 13 April 2018.

I’ve already said it once this year, but I’m going to say it again – Denmark sure has its finger on the pulse of metal at the moment, and their latest export MØL can be added to the list of hottest bands to watch. MØL are blistering yet charming in equal measures. Their brand of ‘black shoegaze’ is nothing short of mesmerising. At times it sounds like the torture of a soul, but other times it sounds oddly soothing; you’re swept up in a whirlwind of dark emotion, then you’re set down in an array of screams and twinkly instrumentation. On paper it shouldn’t work, but it does. MØL have a winning formula with debut album Jord and hopefully they’ll stick to it.

The word ‘jord’ means land/earth and this nicely translates to the sprawling mass of heaviness MØL supply. Shoegaze provides the foundations while black metal influences are firmly rooted in, but the blooms are the spellbinding cascades of feeling MØL conjure. A perfect example of this is opening track Storm. Easing in with a scattering of bold notes, the song soon blooms into a huge wall of sound. The amazing blackened screams of frontman Kim Song Sternkopf are mixed brilliantly with the triumphant guitars. It oddly sounds like black metal indie but it’s far more ambitious than that. The ‘calmer’ moments of the song sound a tad KVELERTAK but the ending rings and resonates in a glorious haze.

The surreal and beautiful Penumbra is a standout track, with its fast riffing and drumming and soaring instrumentation. It sounds like the lovechild of EASTERN FRONT and EDITORS; an unusual but winning combination for sure. The middle eight showcases the band’s ability to pen a tranquil metal tune, before bursting with that black shoegaze sound you’re already falling in love with. For me, the vocals and riffs create an overwhelming atmosphere of feeling, they just hit an emotional nerve. This feeling continues with Bruma, an absolutely spectacular tune of massive proportions. Yes, the heavy breaks are impressive, but the quieter moments provide a mesmerising depth. MØL only need to strike one note and they have filled the mind and soul with an glowing warmth.

Vakuum starts as a straight-up metal track, with the extreme influences coming to the fore, but beautiful guitars interrupt the beastly ruckus to stamp that fantastic shoegaze sound all over it. This steps up a notch with Lambda, a beautiful instrumental piece that fans of MAYBESHEWILL and PELICAN will adore. This post-rock masterpiece enables you to reflect for a moment; it is quite quite a neutral song but has such a strong ‘colour’ you still find yourself swooning along.

The instrumental interlude is soon shattered by the WINTERFYLLETH-esque Ligament. The relentless pace and gut-wrenching screams gets the heart pumping but your pulse is allowed to slow down a bit when the melodic riffs sneak their way in. MØL both ignite and soothe the soul, it’s a wonderful combination. Ligament is the longest song on Jord but it is in no way a slog to get through. It is not easy to predict what shape the song will form, but there is an unexpected, yet nicely executed element towards the end. I won’t spoil it for you, it is one song you will have to indulge in yourself.

It’s tricky to describe Virga without using an oxymoron, but this song is morbidly upbeat. The screams aren’t the most optimistic yet the riffs are so uplifting your spirits can’t help but be raised. The drumming at the end reminds me of One Time For All Time-era 65DAYSOFSTATIC, providing a sense of warming familiarity. MØL do not follow a routine, unlike your typical metal form of screams/clean/sceams/clean. There is no soft/heavy/soft/heavy and this unpredictability of it makes it exciting. This also stands true for the title track, which is also the finale of Jord. The beginning has quite a techy start with its heavy riffs and dark groove. The first half has a menacing ambiance whereas the second consists of surreal melodies and a spellbinding climax. Before you know it, Jord has come to an end and you’re left awestruck and eager for more. Eight tracks might not seem enough for such an impressive release, but it works in MØL’s favour as they don’t out-welcome their stay. Jord is is a spectacular debut album and you can’t help but feel curious about what the band have up their sleeves for album number two.